SnapHack Pro Makes SnapChat Users Vulnerable To Revenge Porn

Snapchat is undoubtedly the favorite app of sexters everywhere, as their insta-disappearing act gives people a certain sense of security. Rather than sending a dick pic or beaver shot that could easily be saved to a hard drive and shared, people who are into that kind of exhibitionism have been opting for the Snapchat share instead.

The app has never been totally private, as any user with quick thumb action could easily take a screenshot and save it. Snapchat tried to make up for that fact by informing users whenever that happened, which I guess kind of gave people control over the images after they sent them?

Yeah, on second thought, not so much.

Anyway, all of that is mute at this point with the introduction of SnapHack Pro. The way it works is pretty simple: all you do is login with your Snapchat name and password and the app will download any and all unopened Snapchats onto your phone.

One catch: any messages opened in the normal Snapchat will disappear as usual.

All of this information is particularly relevant in wake of a new-ish law passed in California that makes “revenge porn” illegal. Revenge porn is commonly understood to be sexually explicit images or videos that are posted online (usually after a breakup) without consent from the person (usually a woman) who is featured.

Because Snapchat is often used to share these kinds of sexy images – and because of the false sense of security built into the app – SnapHack provides guys with a new way to potentially embarrass and sexually harass women who have, ahem, opened up to them.

But don’t think that California’s law protects those Snapchatters if their ex decides to be a dick –

It doesn’t. While the law is a good first step toward the disgusting violation of privacy and robbing of autonomy that is revenge porn, it doesn’t cover selfies. That means that any photo taken by the woman herself and sent to her future asshole ex-boyfriend is fair game to post online.

Can we pause for a minute and let out a resounding, “Are you fucking kidding me?”

According to the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, approximately 80% of all revenge porn images online were created by the victim. That means that California’s law doesn’t cover most of the individuals involved and definitely doesn’t cover any of those SnapHacked images.

A closer look at laws uncovers the fact that there are a quite a few that already exist to protect the victims of revenge porn and that California’s law is really just the first to call out and name this particular problem. It’s an imperfect step in the right direction, one which will hopefully be followed by more and more laws protecting women (and, yes, some men) who have chosen to be intimate with their partners in this way. If nothing else, both the need for a revenge porn law and the fact that SnapHack Pro now exists is a good reminder of one thing: Ain’t nothing private on the internet.

Photo by Brynn Tweeddale via CC License on Flickr.

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